TYPES OF SKIN LESIONS

Macule;-

Flat, non-palpable skin color change. Circumscribed border. This particular lesion is LESS than 1 cm. (ie: freckles, flat moles)

Patch;-

Flat, non-palpable skin color change. Irregular border. This particular lesion is GREATER than 1 cm. (ie: port wine stains, ecchymosis)

Papule(Wart);-

Elevated, palpable, solid mass; circumscribed border. This particular lesion is LESS than 0.5 cm. (ie: warts)

Plaque(Psoriasis);-

Elevated, palpable, solid mass; circumscribed border. This particular lesion is GREATER than 0.5 cm. (may be coalesced papule with flat top) {ie: psoriasis}

Nodule;-

Elevated, solid, palpable mass; extends deeper into dermis than papule. This particular lesion is 0.5-2 cm; circumscribed. (ie: squamous cell carcinoma)

Tumor;-

Elevated, solid, palpable mass; extends deeper into dermis than papule. This particular lesion is GREATER than 1-2 cm; does not always have sharp borders. (carcinoma)

Vesicle;-

Circumscribed elevated, palpable mass containing serous fluid. This particular lesion is LESS than 0.5 cm. (ie: herpes zoster, varicella, poison ivy)

Bulla;-

Circumscribed elevated, palpable mass containing serous fluid. This particular lesion is GREATER than 0.5 cm. (ie: contact dermatitis, large burn blisters)

Wheal;-

Elevated mass with transient borders, often irregular. Size and color vary. Caused by movement of serous fluid into the dermis; does NOT contain free fluid in a cavity. (ie: hives, insect bites)

Pustule;-

Pus-filled vesicle or bulla. (ie: acne, impetigo, carbuncles, furuncles)

Cyst;-

Encapsulated fluid-filled or semi-solid mass; located in the subcutaneous tissue or dermis.

Erosion;-

Loss of superficial epidermis, but does not extend to dermis. Depressed moist area. (ie: ruptured vesicles, scratches)

Ulcer;-

Skin loss extending past epidermis, necrotic tissue loss, bleeding & scarring possible. (ie: pressure ulcer)

Scar;-

Skin mark left after healing of wound or lesion, represents replacement by connective tissue, can be young- red or purple, or mature- white or glistening (ie: healed wound)

Fissure;-

Linear crack in the skin, may extend to the dermis. (ie: chapped lips)

Scales;-

Flakes secondary to desquamated, dead epithelium, may adhere to skin surface. (ie: dandruff, psoriasis)

Crust;-

Dried residue of serum, blood, or pus on skin surface, large one maybe a scab. (ie: residue left after ruptured vesicle)

Keloid;-

Hypertrophied scar tissue, secondary to excessive collagen formation during healing, greater incidence in African Americans. (ie: after ear piercing)

Atrophy;-

Thin, dry, transparent appearance of epidermis, loss of surface markings, underlying vessels may be visible. (ie: aged skin)

Lichenification;-

Thickening & roughening of the skin, accentuated skin markings, may be secondary to repeated rubbing, irritation, or scratching. (ie: contact dermatitis)

Petechia;-

Round red or purple macule, associated with bleeding tendencies or emboli to skin.

Ecchymosis;-

Larger than petechia, this lesion is a round or irregular macule with varying color, and is associated with trauma & bleeding tendencies.

Hematoma;-

A localized collection of blood creating elevated ecchymosis, associated with trauma.

Cherry Angioma;-

Papular and round, red or purple, may blanch with pressure, normal age-related skin alteration, usually not clinically significant.

Spider Angioma;-

Red, arteriole lesion, central body with radiating branches, associated with liver disease, pregnancy, and Vitamin B deficiency.

Telangiectasis;-

Spider-like or linear, bluish or red in color, does not blanch, associated with increased venous pressure states.

Stage I Pressure Ulcer;-

Skin is unbroken but appears red; no blanching when pressed.

Stage II Pressure Ulcer;-

Skin is broken, and there is superficial skin loss involving the epidermis alone or also the dermis. The lesion resembles a vesicle, erosion, or blister.

Stage III Pressure Ulcer;-

Pressure are involves epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue. The ulcer resembles a crater. Hidden areas of damage may extend through the subcutaneous tissue beyond the borders of the external lesion but not through the underlying fascia.

Stage IV Pressure Ulcer;-

Pressure are involves epidermis, dermis, subcutaneous tissue, bone, and other support tissue. The ulcer resembles a massive crater with hidden areas of damage in adjacent tissue.

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Source;- MDSMAFE

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